Kevin Currie

Kevin Currie was a founding member of The Rubber Band, together with school friend Ray Lynn

Kevin remained a key member of the band for 10 years, right through their peak period as one of Sydney's most successful dance bands

Kevin played bass guitar in The Rubber Band as well as singing harmonies and contributing the occasional lead vocal himself.

He remained with the band for over 10 years, including its most successful period, and was a key influence on the band's repertoire and musical direction.

The Rubber Band

29 May 1971 at Unisearch House, University of NSW Sydney, at the NSW Water Ski Association Ball. Kevin is on the far left; vocalist Les Murray is on the right. Ray Lynn (guitar) and Mayliu Currie (vocals) can be made out in the background.

Kevin tells his story: "My first musical instrument was the banjo mandolin, which I learned to play at the age of 10. When I was 12 I got my first acoustic guitar and after learning a few chords, I started playing with my next-door neighbour and friend Ron Johnson, who had also bought himself a guitar.

"Before long we'd graduated to a couple of cheap electric guitars, plugged into an amplifier we made ourselves. We would 'entertain' captured family and friends, and amuse ourselves for hours on end."

The Rubber Band

Ron Johnson (left), and Kevin, with a friend on drums, playing in the lounge room at Kevin's home in 1962.


The Rubber Band

Ron Johnson (left) and Kevin with Ron's younger brother Brian on drums, in front of Kevin's home in 1962. Note the photo is in colour. Colour was unusual in those days. Black and white photos were the norm in Australia for most people until the late 1960s.

Kevin continues, "I was passionate about playing my guitar and in my spare time I would sit in my bedroom for whole days teaching myself the pop songs of the day.

In 1958 and 1959 that meant songs like Your Cheatin' Heart by Hank Williams, Tom Dooley by the Kingston Trio, Suzie Darlin' by the Everly Brothers, Slim Dusty's A Pub With No Beer, Sleepwalk by Santo & Johnny and Forty Miles of Bad Road by Duane Eddy.

"Then in July 1960 The Shadows released Apache, a sensational event for budding young guitarists like Ron and myself. Pop instrumentals had been big throughout the 1950s, but the sound of The Shadows was something altogether new, and everyone wanted to copy that sound.

"I had become friends with fellow student and guitar fanatic Ray Lynn. Ray had his own electric guitar and a real, store-bought amplifier. By early 1963 Ray, Ron Johnson and myself decided to form a band to play like The Shadows.

"Now to sound like the Shadows, you needed two 'normal' guitars (one for lead, one for rhythm), a bass guitar and drums. Three 'normal' guitars and drums would not do. Someone had to play bass, and I quickly decided I was a born bass player. I loved the way the bass both drove and rounded out the overall sound of a band, and how along with the drums it set and controlled the pulse, or tempo of the music, as well as giving each song a distinctive 'feel' or 'style.' I got my parents to get me a cheap bass guitar and I started to work on it. I was 'hooked.'

The Reverbs

The original Reverbs line-up in 1962. L to R kneeling: Ron Johnson (rhythm guitar), Kevin Currie (bass guitar), Ray Lynn (lead guitar). Ron Miles (drums) standing behind. Photo taken in Kevin's backyard. Mick Csapo replaced Ron Johnson on rhythm guitar in 1963.

"Ray Lynn and I were going to the Marist Brothers school at Parramatta at that time. We got to know a classmate, Ron Miles, who played the drums and after some discussion we rehearsed together.

Something clicked with us and a band was born. Ron Johnson played rhythm guitar. We called ourselves The Reverbs (a reverb unit was an electrical/mechanical gadget that guitarists used in those days before digital technology to produce an 'echo' sound from a guitar)."

Kevin married Rubber Band vocalist Mayliu Thomas in 1971. The following year they left the band. Career pressure made it difficult to maintain the high standards of rehearsal and performance that the band had built its reputation around. Kevin and Mayliu knew it was time to move on.

Besides, the music scene was changing, and Kevin's musical tastes started to drift in other directions. He had developed an interest in playing Jazz, and apart from a few relatively short stints in other pop dance bands such as John Long's Rockin Horse, his future work would be mainly with Jazz musicians.


The Reverbs

27 November 1969. Sydney Church of England Girls Grammer School (SCEGGS) Ball held at the Sorlie Room, Arndale Shopping Center, French's Forest, Sydney. Kevin is closest to the camera. Original drummer Ron Miles is behind him. From Kevin's right are Mayliu Currie (then Mayliu Thomas), Les Murray, Ray Lynn and Mick Csapo.

Kevin has now retired after a long career in telecommunications. He has kept his playing up over the years. These days it amounts to occasional jam sessions and gigs with friends.







Kevin Currie

Detail from Rubber Band studio photo 1966.

Kevin Currie

Detail from Rubber Band studio publicity photo 1968.

Kevin Currie

Paddington Town Hall Sydney, 24 February 1968.

Kevin Currie

Relaxing in 1969.

Kevin Currie

Taking a break between sets, Nurses Ball royal Prince alfred Hospital, 9 October 1969.

Kevin Currie

26 March 1970, Sodbuster's Ball, Wentworth Hotel, Sydney.

Kevin Currie

Castle Hill Showground Sydney, 8 July 1970.

Kevin Currie

Crystal Ballroom, Ryde Sydney 18 December 1970. Les Murray in background.